Mary’s and Sheila’s Silhouette #675 Blouses

When a member of our Guild has a good experience with a pattern, there’s a decent chance another or more will also give it a go. The Silhouette #675 “Mani’s Blouse” pattern is one such example.

Below are Mary and Sheila with their versions of Mani’s blouse, with style alterations done by each and worn on a meeting day recently!

Very nicely done, Sheila and Mary!

Mary and Sheila in Silhouette #675
Mary and Sheila in Silhouette #675

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Resource

Faye wanted to share this useful post from the Sewing Loft blog on How to Read a Sewing Pattern

Thanks, Faye! Very useful indeed! Don’t tell the other members but I don’t actually know how to read a sewing pattern! 🙂

That’s what happens when you go generate or draw your own all the time, or stop and do things your own way the minute you hit a step you don’t like or approve of!

How to Draft Your Own Custom Victorian Corset Pattern

As some club members know, Ms Nancy and I are taking a corset making class at NSCAD Extended Studies. We spent the first couple of weeks drafting our own custom Victorian corset patterns, with me using a friend as a model cause there ain’t much to squish on me… not that it’d squish much, anyway.

The pattern drafting was from scratch. Blank piece of paper. Take a bunch of measurements and do what seemed like a gazillion calculations, drawing lines, squaring off at right angles, squaring off more at distances from line intersections, drawing points left and right of them to the millimetre, joining other points using straight lines or curves, etc. I believe we marked about 60 points that had meaning to the pattern!

Then we identified which of the shapes were pieces on our corset, and which were throwaway space before cutting it out.

Now, that’s not really helpful for helping you draft your own custom Victorian corset pattern. And definitely not worthy of the “How to” in the title. So why did I put that there? Because I found pretty much the same technique online, brilliantly shared in all its glorious detail via a 54 page print out PDF you can download and try yourself!

Foundations Revealed Custom Victorian Corset Pattern Drafting Instructions

The link is to page 3 of the full post too long on one page, but most of the key info is there, anyway. The download is near the bottom of this page. They even have two versions, one printer friendly and one colour coded that will make life a fair bit easier for you to understand.

I highly recommend you try this, or just even look at it, just to see what’s involved compared to your regular pattern drafting or alteration of patterns. The art of the art is amazing! They promise you can ask them questions until you get a satisfactory answer! The rest of the corset making involves some other skills not covered, but Ms Nancy and I can answer some of those after our class is over if you want to ask. You can’t badger us relentlessly till you get a satisfactory answer, though! 🙂

Our class is over the night before the December meeting. If things go well, we may have something interesting for Sew and Tell! Well, at least that’s what I’m calling it! 😛

May not be too interesting for me because first time around, it’s hard to design given some things might need to be done between certain steps. Until one has the insight into all the steps, one could easily miss out on when one needed to put in something, or do it only to have it get in the way of the rest of the process. But I’ll guarantee you there’ll be at least a second corset coming after this first one, fully designed, after I get to know all the steps!

In the meanwhile, if you want to see some corsets, there are many on Pinterest (just search for “corset”). I have my own Corset Board if you want to see my tastes in corsets, and also some more resources on my Corset Making board.

Repeat After Me, Chsee… Pao? (Qipao)

I’ve mentioned the Chinese Qípáo before (also called cheongsam), in our Guild meetings and on this site. However, I’ve been “Anglicizing” the pronunciation incorrectly to call it “Kee pow”. The correction pronunciation is actually more like “Chsee Pao?”, with intonation to raise your voice on the second syllable like asking a question, as shown in the beautiful below about the nature and brief history of the Qípáo.

This is supposedly part of a series of 100 words that “represent the essence of traditional Chinese culture, reflect its extensive and profound nature from different angles, and help people overseas better understand China and Chinese culture.”

To think, of all the words they could have chosen for their 100 words, Qípáo was one of them! That makes me all the more excited to be making one in October!

Btw, notice the 26 measurements they require to make one of these things. That’s crazy craftsmanship. The measurements sheet I recently posted seem pretty lame in light of this! I need to learn more about this. For now, though, I’ll have to settle for making the “Anglicized” version of the Qípáo from the Folkwear pattern 122. I’ll learn the details when I find someone who knows the details.

You can see more Qípáo here on my Fashion Pinterest board dedicated to modern Chinese culture. There are some seriously stunning garments here!

Class — Yoga Pants — FULL

This class is now full.

This slim fitting pant is in all the fashion stores this year.  Yoga pants are not just for exercise, they can be made in a variety of stretch fabrics  to look like dress pants. It has a slim fitting look with a 2″ waist band.  You should be able to complete this 3-piece yoga pants Silhouette Patterns, #3400 pattern in one class. It can be ordered online via the previous link for $14.00 US, plus shipping. The morning is for fitting and cutting, the afternoon is for construction.

For construction, a pant weight rayon knit is recommended. Peggy Sagers suggests a Ponte Roma.

Teacher: Mary Baxter

Dates: November 16, 2013

Please click here for more classes and class related information (location, payment, etc.)

Class — Sew a Fully Lined Jacket

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN COMPLETED

Sew a fully-lined jacket the modern way, using fusible interfacing to shape and tailor the fabric instead of hand pad stitching. Armani constructs designer jackets this way, and so can you!

The pattern for the three day class is McCall’s 6172, The Perfect Jacket, from Palmer/Pletsch. It’s a close fitting, fully lined jacket featuring a notched collar, 2-piece sleeves, and welt or patch pockets. With three finished lengths — cropped, hip, and below hip — it’s a classic jacket. And because it’s a Palmer/Pletsch pattern, it’s been designed for success!

Day 1

  • Tissue-fit pattern, fabric prep, cutting pattern from fabrics and interfacing, fusing interfacing.

Day 2

  • Assemble outer shell of jacket including welt/patch pockets, buttonhole prep, sleeves

Day 3

  • Assemble lining, attach lining and outer shell, finishing work

With a week in between classes, there is plenty of time for slower sewers to catch up. We want a happy sewing class, not a harried one!

Recommended fabrics: wool crepe, wool gabardine, wool blends, wool tweed. (Wool is a great fabric for tailoring!)

An optional notions package, including Palmer/Pletsch interfacing, and sleeve head interfacing, will be available if desired.

Teacher: Tory LeBlanc

Dates: Oct 19 and 26, Nov 2, 2013 (3 days)

Please click here for more classes and class related information (location, payment, etc.)

Jan 12th Classes Changed to Weekender Tote Bag Class (Loes Hinse 5401)

The classes originally scheduled for January 12th, 2013, have had their topics changed.

Originally, the classes were Fly Zipper by Jerry Craig, and Techniques, by Faye Morrison.

They will now be one class, making a Tote (Weekender) Bag from Loes Hinse pattern 5401, to be taught by Vickie Craig. It is a half day class.

If you order the pattern soon, you will get it by the class date of January 12, 2013. It will take a few weeks for the pattern to arrive after you order.

The class is at the Halifax Christian Church, at 51 Farnham Gate Road in Clayton Park West/Rockingham. (see map at below).

More information on class rules and requirements (especially for payment), and other classes still upcoming, can be found on our Classes page.

If anyone is interested, please get in touch with Vickie Craig as soon as possible! An email has gone out to members with Vickie’s contact information, not left her to avoid spamming her. Non-members, please leave a comment (requiring your email) and I will send you the contact information.

 

A Pattern for Collars (Simplicity 1727)

A Pattern for Collars (Simplicity 1727)

I found this new pattern online this morning and thought I’d share why I thought it’d be of value to most sewists, myself included, on my blog. However, I don’t have a review on how good the pattern is, because I haven’t tried it, obviously.

Simplicity is on sale later this month at Fabricville for $1.99 each, if you need one, between Oct 29 to Nov 2. However, Read more