Very Easy DIY Wheel or Ringed Buttons

DIY Wheeled buttons

Very Easy DIY Wheel or Ringed Buttons

Desperation and necessity led me to invent this today while shopping at Fabricville. 🙂

Goes with my new look I hope to show our members at our June meeting next week.

Would this count as embellishments for our new challenge nobody has yet to send me text for to post?

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Resource

Faye wanted to share this useful post from the Sewing Loft blog on How to Read a Sewing Pattern

Thanks, Faye! Very useful indeed! Don’t tell the other members but I don’t actually know how to read a sewing pattern! 🙂

That’s what happens when you go generate or draw your own all the time, or stop and do things your own way the minute you hit a step you don’t like or approve of!

Making a Body Double Class

On Saturday, Guild Members Fran, Kathleen and I took part in the Making a Body Double Class given by our President, Josée.

The class was very informative, enjoyable and interesting, with something really useful for us sewists at the end, a dress form just like our own bodies!

Josée had a fairly easy and easy to follow set of instructions with garbage bags, packing tape, scissors, exacto knife, Sharpie pens, and weight on end of string (plumb weight). The process was methodical to tape on three layers, with short tape strips for areas with more curvature. The first was to be done slowly to get the shaping right, mostly up and down but sometimes in the direction of curvature. The second crossed that perpendicularly, and the third was back in the same direction as the first, for some strength.

Then came markings of gravity lines, where a weight on a string hangs from the front, back and sides. Contrast that with where you look visually centred, in case you aren’t ideally shaped and/or bent in those areas. This helps you put seams where they look aesthetically pleasing rather than where gravity lines are that pattern lines tend to be built on cause they are designed for more symmetric and uniform bodies than most of us have.

Notches were then put on like zippers (but not so close like real zipper teeth are) so that when we were cut out at the back, we would know how to line up the marks to close and fill the body doubles again. A horizontal line was also made so that we would know how high to properly mount the body double. Good for full length gown or pants gauging as well. We did this, as well as got the body double made, in shoes we normally wore for the same heights and body stature.

Finally, we were cut out of our body shells. We will mount and stuff the body doubles later.

I didn’t have someone to work on so Josée was nice enough to do a full body double for me, and not just the torso like a dress form. I will make use of this making body armour style costumes where arm and leg joint lengths and thicknesses, will be key. They would be next to impossible to measure accurately on my own, and cumbersome to do with others measuring as it would be a trial and error process throughout that would require lots of remeasurement and eyeballing. That person would be there almost the entire time, in other words, but not with my body double! Picture is at the bottom.

Thanks to Josée and classmates for a wonderful, enjoyable and useful class! If Josée ever offers it again, I’m sure I can speak for my classmates that we would highly recommend it!

body double

Fixing Zippers 101

by Faye Morrison

Ever been at your wits end when you discover your zipper no longer works on an otherwise perfectly good jacket, dress, purse, etc?

I discovered a great new video about a product called FixnZip this morning on YouTube but haven’t tried it out yet; but I’m definitely going to try and lay my hands on one.

Fixing jackets are the absolute worst!

Ruffle Necktie T-Shirt Tutorial

ruffletee2I thought this was a delightful idea, especially for you ladies with male significant others who have boring ties they no longer wore. This would be even better if they had interesting ties they no longer wore… or maybe never wore in the first place because they were not conservative enough! 🙂

From the McKell’s Closet blog.

That Medical Paper for Pattern Tracing

I’m in the middle of creating a ton of patterns for dress shirts with different yokes for my new wardrobe. I’m doing so using that medical tracing paper Miss Nancy occasionally gets for us in bulk at no cost to her. It’s doing wonders for my work and I just thought I’d take a moment to give her a shout out and send some love for it!

I canNOT imagine where I’d be without it! Nor would I want to!

It’s by far the best thing I spend money on for sewing when it comes down to a per dollar value at $4 a roll that could support a wardrobe. The serger is gonna take a lifetime to at least match that! Or at least half a dozen wardrobe makeovers, the first of which I’m just starting on now.

Thanks, Miss Nancy! Keep on showing us good new stuff. It might be a bit of a lottery which ones will have a huge impact, but if you don’t play, you can’t win, right?

Now, this new wardrobe thing had better work well, or else, the yoke will be on me!

Boooooooooooooooooooooo…. 😦

How to Draft Your Own Custom Victorian Corset Pattern

As some club members know, Ms Nancy and I are taking a corset making class at NSCAD Extended Studies. We spent the first couple of weeks drafting our own custom Victorian corset patterns, with me using a friend as a model cause there ain’t much to squish on me… not that it’d squish much, anyway.

The pattern drafting was from scratch. Blank piece of paper. Take a bunch of measurements and do what seemed like a gazillion calculations, drawing lines, squaring off at right angles, squaring off more at distances from line intersections, drawing points left and right of them to the millimetre, joining other points using straight lines or curves, etc. I believe we marked about 60 points that had meaning to the pattern!

Then we identified which of the shapes were pieces on our corset, and which were throwaway space before cutting it out.

Now, that’s not really helpful for helping you draft your own custom Victorian corset pattern. And definitely not worthy of the “How to” in the title. So why did I put that there? Because I found pretty much the same technique online, brilliantly shared in all its glorious detail via a 54 page print out PDF you can download and try yourself!

Foundations Revealed Custom Victorian Corset Pattern Drafting Instructions

The link is to page 3 of the full post too long on one page, but most of the key info is there, anyway. The download is near the bottom of this page. They even have two versions, one printer friendly and one colour coded that will make life a fair bit easier for you to understand.

I highly recommend you try this, or just even look at it, just to see what’s involved compared to your regular pattern drafting or alteration of patterns. The art of the art is amazing! They promise you can ask them questions until you get a satisfactory answer! The rest of the corset making involves some other skills not covered, but Ms Nancy and I can answer some of those after our class is over if you want to ask. You can’t badger us relentlessly till you get a satisfactory answer, though! 🙂

Our class is over the night before the December meeting. If things go well, we may have something interesting for Sew and Tell! Well, at least that’s what I’m calling it! 😛

May not be too interesting for me because first time around, it’s hard to design given some things might need to be done between certain steps. Until one has the insight into all the steps, one could easily miss out on when one needed to put in something, or do it only to have it get in the way of the rest of the process. But I’ll guarantee you there’ll be at least a second corset coming after this first one, fully designed, after I get to know all the steps!

In the meanwhile, if you want to see some corsets, there are many on Pinterest (just search for “corset”). I have my own Corset Board if you want to see my tastes in corsets, and also some more resources on my Corset Making board.

The Stewed Tomato Cutting Board

Submitted by Norma

I have been sewing more than a garment a month and the floor has become unacceptable as the cutting table. I tried our small round dining table with a cardboard cutting mat on top – The table wasn’t big enough to provide support to the end of the cardboard mat and it was too low 😦

Our buffet was the perfect height but too narrow 😦

Solution the “stewed tomato cutting board” 🙂

Ingredients:

  • 4 cans stewed or diced tomatoes (or apple juice if you prefer)
  • 1 cardboard cutting mat
  • 1 side board or buffet

Combine as shown in photo below

Stewed Tomato Cutting Board (click to enlarge)
Stewed Tomato Cutting Board (click to enlarge)

 

Thanks to Norma for this post submission! She emailed me the title, text and photo (many is fine). That’s all YOU have to do if you’d like to submit posts for our Guild site, if you are a Guild Member. I hope many more will follow in Norma’s example and show the world your beautiful and innovative creations, share your knowledge, or just otherwise entertain and enlighten us and our readers out there, in the Guild or not! 🙂

Minh

How I Elegantly Transfer Darts on Patterns

How I Elegantly Transfer Darts on Patterns.

Please somebody tell me some people transfer darts this way. Hopefully, I just simply haven’t had enough sewing education to have heard about it, cause it’s so simple and effective it’s ridiculous this isn’t the way darts are taught to be transferred rather than all that chalk paper and pointy roller thingy method that requires a manual and half a hazard suit.